Sending Mail from a Different Address in Gmail

Gmail lets you send messages with another of your email addresses listed as the sender instead of your Gmail address. This feature helps you manage multiple accounts from the Gmail interface; it works only if you already own the email account linked to the alternate address. To send mail from a different Gmail username, you’ll first need to sign up for that address. Select an option below for instructions on how to add your other addresses to your Gmail account.

Once you’re set up: sending mail

To use one of your alternate sender addresses, just pick an address from the drop-down menu in the ‘From:’ field when you compose a message. If you’re replying or forwarding to a message, click ‘change’ next to the ‘From:’ field. You can also choose to automatically use the address to which a message was sent.

To edit the name, configuration or reply-to address for an existing entry, click edit next to the address on your Accounts tab. To delete an address, just click delete.

Note for IMAP/POP users: If you access Gmail through a POP or IMAP email client (e.g. Outlook) and would like to send messages with a custom “from” address, you have two options. We recommend that you configure your email client with two outgoing SMTP servers, one for Gmail and one for your other address. Or, you can use Gmail’s outbound servers with a different “from” address. If you’ve already configured the alternate address, your message will be sent from:[email protected], sender:[email protected], regardless of which custom from configuration you chose.

  • SMTP: SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) is a set of standard Internet procedures by which two email providers (ex. Gmail, Yahoo Mail), transfer email messages to one another’s mail servers.
  • domain: A domain is a name for an IP address and is more commonly recognized as a website or web address. For example, Google.com is a domain.
  • SSL: SSL (secure socket layer) is a way of changing data such as your username and password into code as it travels across the Internet, so that the data will be secure and private.
  • ISP: An ISP (Internet Service Provider) is a company (ex. AOL, AT&T, and Comcast) that gives your computer Internet access. ISPs are usually the companies that come to your house and set up all the wires.
  • TLS: TLS (Transport Layer Security) is a way of changing data such as your username and password into code as it travels across the Internet, so that the data will be secure and private. With mail delivery, TLS begins with an unsecured connection to the mail servers, and then upgrades to a secure connection once information is sent.
  • POP: POP (Post office protocol) is a one-way download of your messages that allows you to access your mail with a mail program like Outlook Express or Apple Mail. POP only offers one-way communication, which means that actions you take in the mail program (like marking a message as read) won’t be synced to Gmail.
  • IMAP: IMAP (Internet message access protocol) lets you download messages from Gmail so you can access your mail with a program like Outlook Express or Apple Mail. IMAP syncs the actions you take in Outlook Express or Apple Mail with Gmail so if you read a message in your mail client, it’ll be marked as read in Gmail. [source]